How To Write a Cover Letter For A Job In The Fitness Industry

Fitness industry is getting more competitive by the day. There are more instructors and professionals now than ever. If you want a job, you need to have great skills. But, you also have to know how to present them in a good way, so that recruiters can see just how awesome you are at what you do.

To show them this, you need a good cover letter. Resumes are a bit brief and there is not a lot of room to show them why exactly you are the right person for the job. However, cover letters are a perfect place for this. Here are some tips on writing a great cover letter that will impress and get you hired:

Write About What You Have to Offer

One of the worst mistakes you can make is create a retelling of your resume in the form of a cover letter. Don’t do this. Both the resume and the cover letter have their purposes. One is a list of your credentials and achievements but the other is an elaborate tale of why you are the perfect person for the position. So, for instance, you would put your fitness education in the resume but show how this education benefits the employer in the cover letter.

The purpose of the cover letter is for you to introduce yourself and what you can offer to the employer. Think of it as copywriting. Instead of reiterating which skills you have, talk about how those skills can make the employer’s life better. What makes you the right person for the job?

These are the things that you should write about in your cover letter. Use quantifiable data and previous results to prove this point. Read the job advertisement and make a conclusion on what the most important traits and skills are and then convince them that you can deliver, that you are the right person for the job.

Use Powerful Language

Your tone of voice and your language are equally important to what you say. If you deliver the information in a poor style, you might be rejected just based on that. So, instead of being clumsy with your words, try using powerful language.

For instance, avoid passive voice. It sounds unconvincing and it removes focus from what really matters. Use active voice instead.

There are also some words which are more powerful than the others. So, for instance, you can use:

  • Achieved
  • Created
  • Because
  • Solved
  • Influenced

And many more words which signal to your employers that you are successful and a great option for the job position.

Customize

“Every time you apply to a new position, you need to change your cover letter. One cover letter can’t work for all employers mostly because the requirements of the job position and the company is not the same. They all have different expectations,” says Annie Felix, a recruitment manager at Australian reviewer and Academized.

So, each time you apply for a job, take a good look at their ad and customize the cover letter to match that.

Make sure that everything is adapted and that it works for the job.

Use Online Tools to Polish Your Letter

One of the most common mistakes candidates make is not checking their cover letter for grammar and spelling mistakes when they really should. These do not look professional and they deteriorate your chances at getting hired. Here are some tools you can use to fix those mistakes and impress your employers.

  • Study demic suggests online editing guides which can help you remove repetition and redundancies from your cover letter
  • Boomessays is an online proofreading and editing tool that can assist you in creating better and more accurate cover letters.
  • Revieweal and Academ advisor are grammar checkers which also offer guides on writing without any grammar mistakes.
  • Paper fellows and Assignment help are formatting tools to create accurate cover letters.
  • Oxessays is a proofreading and plagiarism guide that can be of assistance in making your cover letter unique and interesting while accurate at the same time.

Share Your Values

The employer is probably not looking just for great and matching skills but also for someone who will be in sync with their mission and desires when it comes to fitness. If, for example, the employer wants to get in shape after pregnancy, you should reiterate your values – losing weight in a healthy way, creating a fitness schedule that would work for a new mother and her lifestyle and so on. You have to match your values to the employer’s values. Don’t apply if you see that the person doesn’t understand the true meaning of fitness and health and just wants to lose weight quickly. You’ll be unhappy and disagree with your employer often.

Be Concise and Clear But Informative

Don’t make a mistake of rambling on and on. Your potential employers don’t have time for this. They want to see someone direct, who knows what they can do and are not afraid to show it. Someone who knows how to use their skills properly. Be concise, your cover letter shouldn’t be longer than one Word page – the shorter the better is the case here.

However, don’t cut back on the value. Make sure that you have said everything that you want to say and that you have accurately represented yourself. Be casual in your tone but stay away from being friendly or using slang. Regular people hardly understand all of the jargon from the industry so just try to stick with regular words. Again, read the job ad and see which words they used – one of the most powerful ways to grab employer’s attention is to use their own words.

Close Quickly

After you are done writing the body of your cover letter, recap in a sentence or two why you are the best candidate and finish your cover letter. It needs to be brief and fresh so it doesn’t sound like you are rambling on.

You can, for example, reiterate how exactly you plan on helping them or what some part of the schedule will look like.

Make sure that your cover letter really speaks of who you are and what you can do for them. Hopefully these tips will help.

Author Bio:

Freddie Tubbs is a recruitment consultant at Bigassignments. He regularly attends human resources and business events, and contributes post to the Vault and Oxessays blogs.




©2019 AskTheTrainer.com.  HOME  |  ABOUT  |  CONTACT  |  TERMS

askthetrainer logo

Log in with your credentials

Forgot your details?