Top 5 Group Exercise Classes for Your Return to the Gym

group exercise class

Introduction

The gradual reopening of many cities across the country means, for many people, a return to the gym. Whether you have been able to keep your workout routine through lockdown or quarantine hasn’t been kind to you, you will likely be hoping for something to shake up your workout routine.

Enter group exercise classes, the incredibly popular service provided by many gyms that allows you to work out in tandem with others and can help you to avoid the boredom and lack of motivation that plagues many people’s efforts to get and stay fit.

But what group exercise classes should you take? Here are the top 5 group exercise classes that you should consider.

Barre

Barre consists of 45-50 minute total body workouts, giving you the most bang for your buck as far as overall strength, balance, and sculpting goes.

Using a ballet barre and other equipment, barre is among the easiest group exercises to get started on, and its focus on low-impact movements means that initial flexibility and joint pain are less of an issue than in yoga or other full-body workouts.

Pilates

Barre’s more intense older brother, pilates is an intense mixture of cardio and strength training, all wrapped up in a total body workout that will make you sweat.

If you want results more quickly than on average and aren’t afraid of a rather intense discipline, pilates may be the group exercise class for you.

And because of its focus on the whole body rather than on different bits of it, pilates is incredibly efficient when it comes to body sculpting compared to pure strength or cardio training.

Yoga

Yoga is one of the most popular and fastest-growing group exercise classes in the United States, so you will be able to easily find classes for every skill level.

Unlike barre or pilates, yoga focuses on getting your body in tune with itself, leading to greater balance and strength in a more natural way than the strength training based practices we’ve already talked about.

In addition, yoga has its roots in a spiritual practice, and there are certain ways in which you can get in contact with yogis who will bring those elements back into what has become just another group exercise class.

Zumba

According to Cardio Haus, Zumba classes “combine a series of dance moves paired with music to be fun while getting a complete cardio workout.

Zumba is driven by the music to help push your limit to the next level.” The most modern of the disciplines and group exercise classes listed so far, Zumba uses elements of dance to craft a total body workout that concentrates on creating a sense of balance and grace.

Strength Training

The majority of stereotypical group classes concentrate on balance and cardio, with only a passing glance at strength. But you should not hesitate to do strength training in a group class setting.

Not only will you add an element of healthy competition and have the benefit of a trainer who knows how to guide you in properly lifting, you will also always be guaranteed to have a spotter.

Group strength training is also a good option if you are just starting out in trying to get stronger, since they will be attuned to your level of experience and provide more structure and guidance than going it alone.

Conclusion

Group exercise classes are a fantastic way to connect with others and improve your physical, mental, and emotional health.

If you’ve been craving more social interaction since this covid fiasco, don’t hesitate to look for classes in your local area, but most importantly, sign up!

Pilates, Yoga, Zumba, Barre, and strength training are all great group activities. Group spinning (cycling) classes are also a classic group exercise to take up if these aren’t to your liking.

Moral of the story, get yourself out there and enjoy life, and one of the best ways to do so is to participate in group exercise activities with your fellow humans.

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